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Monthly Archives: November 2011

Baking Pan Sizes

Foodelicious Heaven:  Many a time we will find difficulties in fitting a recipe into the baking pan that we already have on hand and it’s too much to keep all the different pan sizes.  Thus providing here a pan sizes chart that you can convert the recipe into volume and find an alternative pan that can fit the recipe.  I find this really useful information and would like to share with all of you!!  Happy Baking!!

The following charts show commonly used baking pans and dishes and the approximate volume. If you don’t have the same size pan called for in a specific recipe, and you want to substitute another pan, choose a pan with the same volume capacity.

Since many pans may be imported from Europe or Asia, pan sizes are not always uniform. If your pan is not exactly the same measurement as shown below, a small difference in size should not affect the recipe or baking time.

If you have substituted a different pan that what is stated in a recipe, the baking time may need to change, especially for cakes and breads. If baked in a wider pan, the depth of the batter will decrease and the batter will bake more quickly. If baked in a narrower pan, the depth of the batter will increase and the batter will require a longer baking time.

To measure a pan and determine the pan’s volume:

  1. To measure the pan’s size, use a ruler to measure pans from inside edge to inside edge. Do not measure from the outside edges as you do not want to include the thickness of the pan in your measurement.
  2. To measure the pan’s depth, place a ruler on the kitchen counter and measure straight up from the bottom of the pan. If the pan edge is slanted, do not slant the ruler, measure straight up.
  3. To measure the pan’s volume, use a liquid measuring cup to pour water into the pan until it reaches the top.
Round Cake Pans
Pan Size and Type Volume
6 x 2 inch round Cake Pan 4 cups
8 x 1½ inch round Cake Pan 4 cups
8 x 2 inch round Cake Pan 7 cups
9 x 1½ inch round Cake Pan 6 cups
9 x 1¾ inch round Cake Pan 7½ cups
9 x 2 inch round Cake Pan 8 cups
9 x 3 inch round Cake Pan 13 cups
10 x 2 inch round Cake Pan 11 cups
12 x 2 inch round Cake Pan 15 cups
14 x 2 inch round Cake Pan 21 cups
Square Pans
Pan Size and Type Volume
8 x 8 x 1½ inch Square Pan 6 cups
8 x 8 x 2 inch Square Pan 8 cups
9 x 9 x 1½ inch Square Pan 8 cups
9 x 9 x 2 inch Square Pan 10 cups
10 x 10 x 2 inch Square Pan 12 cups
12 x 12 x 2 inch Square pan 16 cups
Rectangular Pans
Pan Size and Type Volume
11 x 7 x 2 inch Rectangular Pan 8 cups
13 x 9 x 2 inch Rectangular Pan 15 cups
Jelly Roll Pans
Pan Size and Type Volume
10½ x 15½ x 1 inch Jelly Roll Pan 10 cups
12½ x 17½ by 1 inch Jelly Roll Pan 12 cups
Loaf Pans
Pan Size and Type Volume
2¼ x 4 x 1¼ inch mini Loaf Pan 2/3 cup
7-3/8 x 3-5/8 x 2 inch Loaf Pan 3 cups
8 x 4 x 2½ inch Loaf Pan 4 cups
8½ x 4½ x 2½ inch Loaf Pan 5 cups
9¼  x 5¼  x 2½  inch Loaf Pan 7 cups
Bundt and Tube Pans
Pan Size and Type Volume
1¾ x 4 inch Bundt Cup, mini 1 cup
6½ x 3½ inch Bundt Pan 5½ cups
7½ x 3 inch Bundt Pan 6 cups
8½ x 3½ inch Bundt Pan 7 cups
9 x 3 inch Bundt Pan 9 cups
10 x 3½ inch Bundt Pan 12 cups
9 x 4½ inch Nordic Ware Bundt Pan 15 cups
8½ x 3½ inch Kugelhopf Pan 9 cups
9 x 4 inch Kugelhopf Pan 12 cups
9 x 5 inch Nordic Ware Kugelhopf Pan 10 cups
8½ x 4 inch Nordic Ware Bavaria Pan 10 cups
7½ x 3 inch Tube Pan 6 cups
8 x 3 inch Tube Pan 9 cups
6 x 3 inch Angel Food Cake Tube Pan 4 cups
9 x 3 inch Angel Food Cake Tube Pan 10 cups
10 x 4 inch Angel Food Cake Tube Pan 16 cups
Springform Pans
Pan Size and Type Volume
6 x 3 inch Springform Pan 4 cups
7 x 2½ inch Springform Pan 5½ cups
8 x 2 inch Springform Pan 6 cups
8½ x 2½ inch Springform Pan 7½ cups
9½ x 2½ inch Springform Pan 9 cups
8 x 3 inch Springform Pan 10 cups
9 x 3 inch Springform Pan 11 cups
10 x 2½ inch Springform Pan 12 cups
Muffin Pans
Pan Size and Type Volume
1¾ x ¾ inch Muffin Cup, mini 2 tablespoons
2¾ x 1-3/8 inch Muffin Cup, standard Scant ½ cup
3-3/8 x 1¾ inch Muffin Cup, jumbo /8 cup
Pie Pans
Pan Size and Type Volume
8 x 1¼ in Pie Pan 3 cups
9 x 1 inch Pie Pan, foil 3 cups
9 x 1½ inch Pie Pan, Pyrex 4 cups
9 x 2 inch Pie Pan, Emile Henry, Ceramic Fluted 6 cups
10 x 1½ inch Pie Pan, Pyrex 6½ cups
9½ x 2 inch Pie Pan, Pyrex Fluted deep dish 7 cups
Tart and Tartlet Pans
Pan Size and Type Volume
2½ x ¾ inch Tartlet Pan, mini 2 tablespoons
3 x 5/8 inch Tartlet Pan, mini 3½ tablespoons
3½ x 5/8 inch Tartlet Pan, mini 5 tablespoons
4 x 1¼ inch Round Tart pan with Removable Bottom ¾ cup
4½ x 1 inch Round Tart pan with Removable Bottom ¾ cup
4¾ x ¾ inch Round Tart pan with Removable Bottom ¾ cup
5½ x 1 inch Round Tart pan with Removable Bottom 1½ cups
7¾ x 1 inch Round Tart pan with Removable Bottom 3 cups
9½ x 1 inch Round Tart pan with Removable Bottom 4 cups
10 x 1 inch Round Tart pan with Removable Bottom 5½ cups
11 x 1 inch Round Tart pan with Removable Bottom 7 cups
10 x 2 inch Round Tart pan with Removable Bottom 8 cups
12½ x 1 inch Round Tart pan with Removable Bottom 9 cups
14 x 4½ x 1 inch Oblong Tart pan with Removable Bottom 4 cups
11½ x 7½ x 1 inch Oblong Tart Pan with Removable Bottom 6 cups
Other Pans
Pan Size and Type Volume
8 x 2½ inch Heart Shaped Pan 8½ cups
9¼ x 6-5/8 inch Oval Shaped Pan 6 cups
9½ x 3¼ inch Brioche Pan 8 cups
9¼ x 2¾ inch Ring Mold 8 cups
3¼ x 1¾ inch Custard Cup ¾ cup
3¼ x 2 inch Soufflé Dish 2/3 cup
3¾ x 1-7/8 inch Soufflé Dish 1 cup
3½ x 2 inch Soufflé dish 1¼ cups
7½ x 3¼ inch Soufflé Dish 7½ cups
9½ inch Flan Ring 4½ cups
11 inch Flan Ring 6 cups

http://thebakingpan.com/baking-basics/baking-pan-sizes.html

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Posted by on November 28, 2011 in Baking Tips

 

Japanese Style Bacon and Cheese Bread (Tangzhong Method 湯種法)

A few years ago, an amazing method of making this kind of soft and fluffy bread was introduced by Yvonne Chen 陳郁芬 who wrote a Chinese book, entitled “65°C湯種麵包” (Bread Doctor). In her book, tangzhong “湯種”, is described as the “secret ingredient” which is originated from Japan, to make soft and bouncy bread. It’s actually a kind of “flour paste”(aka water roux starter), cooked 1 part of bread flour in 5 parts of water to 65°C. So it’s very natural and handy to make. The Chinese community has been fascinated and crazy about this bread making method ever since.

Why does tangzhong 湯種 (flour paste) work so amazingly that can produce fluffy bread and stay soft for many days? At 65°C, the gluten in the flour and water mixture would absorb the moisture and become leavened. When tangzhonog is added into other ingredients of the bread, the bread dough will be heightened and produces softer bread.


Prepare a 10.5cm(W)x 20.5cm(L) x10cm(H) loaf tin (Printable recipe)

Ingredients of tangzhong (湯種 The amount is enough to make two loafs):

  • 50gm/ 1/3 cup bread flour
  • 250ml/ 1cup water (could be replaced by milk, or 50/50 water and milk)

Ingredients of bread:

  • 350gm/ 2½ cups bread flour
  • 55gm/3tbsp+2tsp caster sugar
  • 5gm/1tsp salt
  • 56gm egg (equals to 1 large egg)
  • 7gm/1tbsp+1tsp milk powder (to increase fragrance, optional)
  • 125ml/ ½cup milk
  • 120gm tangzhong (use half of the tangzhong you make from above)
  • 5 to 6gm/2 tsp instant yeast
  • 30gm/3tbsp butter (cut into small pieces, softened at room temperature)

Fillings:

  • bacon, to taste
  • cheese, to taste

Method of making tangzhong:

  1. Mix flour in water well without any lumps. Cook over medium-low heat, stirring consistently with a wooden spoon, whisk or spatula to prevent burning and sticking while you cook along the way.
  2. The mixture becomes thicker and thicker. Once you notice some “lines” appear in the mixture for every stir you make with the spoon. It’s done. You get the tangzhong. (Some people might like to use a thermometer to check the temperature. After a few trials, I found this simple method works every time.) Remove from heat.
  3. Transfer into a clean bowl. Cover with a cling wrap sticking onto the surface of tangzhong to prevent from drying up. Let cool. Chill in fridge for several hours. (I chill it overnight.) Then the tangzhong is ready to be used. (Note: When you are ready to use the tangzhong, just measure out the amount you need and let it rest in room temperature for a while before adding into other ingredients. The tangzhong can be stored up to a few days as long as it doesn’t turn grey. If so, you need to discard and cook some more.)


Method of making bread:

  1. Combine all dry ingredients: flour, salt, sugar and instant yeast in a bowl. Make a well in the center. Whisk and combine all wet ingredients: milk, egg and tangzhong, then add into the well of the dry ingredients. Knead until you get a dough shape and gluten has developed, then knead in the butter. Mind you, it’d be quite messy at this stage (That’s why I used a bread maker). Keep kneading until the dough is smooth, not sticky and elastic. To test if the dough is ready, you might stretch the dough. If it forms a thin “membrane”, it’s done. The time of kneading all depends on how hard and fast you knead. (Note: I use bread maker to do this hardest part and messy job for me. I added the wet ingredients into my bread maker first, then followed by the dry ingredients. The yeast is the last to add.)
  2. Knead the dough into a ball shape. Place in a greased bowl and cover with a wet towel or cling wrap. Let it proof till it’s doubled in size, about 40 minutes (Note: the time will vary and depends on the weather. The best temperature for proofing is 28C. I still used my bread maker in this stage. And my bread maker has a heater.)
  3. Transfer to a clean floured surface. Deflate and divide the dough into four equal portions. Knead into ball shapes. Cover with cling wrap, let rest for 15 minutes.
  4. Roll out each portion of the dough with a rolling pin into an oval shape. Sprinkle bacon and cheese evenly as much as you like. Roll from the upper, shorter end down to the bottom (as picture shown). Flatten the dough with your rolling pin. Then roll once again. The seals face down.
  5. Arrange the rolled-up dough in a greased or non-stick loaf tin (as picture shown). Leave it for the 2nd round of proofing, about 40 minutes, or until the dough rises up to 3/4 of the height of the tin inside.
  6. Brush whisked egg on surface. Bake in a pre-heated 180C (356F) oven for 35 to 40 minutes. Remove from the oven and tin. Transfer onto a wire rack and let cool completely. Slice to serve or place in an airtight plastic bag or container once it’s thoroughly cooled.
Notes:
  1. If you find yourself too tired of kneading dough, just like me, you can use a bread maker instead. This recipe is designed for bread makers, yet you can make a soft and fluffy loaf with or without it, by using the tangzhong.
  2. The cheese would be melted and created some holes inside the bread. If you’d like a better looking, cut the cheese into smaller pieces.

This is the raisin bread I made with the same recipe. Just replaced the bacon and cheese with raisin.

 
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Posted by on November 23, 2011 in Bread

 

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Hong Kong Style Sausage Rolls


Hong Kong Style Sausage Rolls (Printable recipe)

Makes 4 to 6

Ingredients

  • 4 to 6 sausages, any kind to your liking
  • 350 gm bread flour
  • 55 gm caster sugar
  • 5 gm salt
  • 56 gm egg
  • 7 gm milk powder (to increase fragrance, optional)
  • 125 ml milk
  • 120 gm tangzhong (refer to this recipe for making tanzhong)
  • 5 to 6 gm instant yeast
  • 30 gm butter (cut into small pieces, softened at room temperature)

Method:

  1. Combine all dry ingredients: flour, salt, sugar and instant yeast in a bowl. Make a well in the center. Whisk and combine all wet ingredients: milk, egg and tangzhong, then add into the well of the dry ingredients. Knead until you get a dough shape and gluten has developed, then knead in the butter. Mind you, it’d be quite messy at this stage (That’s why I used a bread maker). Keep kneading until the dough is smooth, not sticky and elastic. (Tip: you might like to test if the dough is ready. Stretch the dough with two hands. If it forms a thin “membrane” that’s very elastic in texture. Use a finger to poke a hole. If the hole is a circle, not an irregular tear-off (see picture 1). That means you have successfully kneaded the dough to a perfect stage. Yet, don’t over-knead the dough. Otherwise all the tissues inside would be broken apart.) The time of kneading all depends on how hard and fast you knead. (Note: I use bread maker to do this hardest part and messy job for me. I added the wet ingredients into my bread maker first, then followed by the dry ingredients. The yeast is the last to add.)
  2. Knead the dough into a ball shape. Place in a greased bowl and cover with a wet towel or cling wrap. Let it proof till it’s doubled in size, about 40 minutes (Note: the time will vary and depends on the weather. The best temperature for proofing is 28C. I still used my bread maker in this stage. And my bread maker has a heater.)
  3. Transfer to a clean floured surface. Deflate and divide the dough into four to six equal portions. Knead into ball shapes. Cover with cling wrap, let rest for 15 minutes (see picture 2).
  4. Knead each part into a long tube, about 41cm in length (it depends on how long your sausage). Roll to enclose the sausage, with seals facing down (see picture 3). Place rolls on a tray lined with baking paper, covered with cling wrap or a wet towel. Leave it for the 2nd round of proofing, about 45 to 60 minutes, until double in size.
  5. Brush whisked egg on surface of rolls. Bake in a pre-heated 180C (356F) oven for 35 minutes, or until golden brown. Transfer onto a wire rack and let cool completely.

Notes:
  • This bread can be made with or without a bread maker.
  • Testing your dough before proofing is quite important to make sure you’ll enjoy soft and fluffy bread after baking.
  • The time of proofing has to be long enough, yet not to over-do, in order to get the best result.
 
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Posted by on November 23, 2011 in Bread

 

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